Let the Treatment Begin!

Abigail Duckor

Following the research conducted by Claire d’Izarny-Gargas, further examination led to the formation of treatment plans for Angel A and Angel B. As discussed earlier, Angel A was in decidedly better condition, so it was tackled first.

Claire starting the treatment on Angel A

Claire starting the treatment on Angel A, courtesy of Norfolk Museums Service, T1878333.

On the front and the back of the angel were two different types of surfaces. The front was a gilded layer, which was flaking and delaminating. The back featured a painted layer, also undergoing flaking, but not as extensively. The front and the back of Angel A therefore underwent different treatments. This blog post discusses the relaying of the flaking gilded surface. For the front of the angel the main goals were to clean the surface (which was very, very dirty!) and to relay the remaining flakes. An initial gentle clean was done with a cotton wool swab and a solution of 50:50 IMS (industrial methylated spirit) and deionised water. This method was selected after some cleaning tests were carried out in an inconspicuous area.

Cleaning tests on Angel A.

Cleaning tests on Angel A. Courtesy of Norfolk Museums Service, T1878333.

The flakes were then relayed by first saturating the area with the 50:50 IMS/ deionised water solution. Then, using a small brush, a drop of warmed gelatin solution (5% w/v in deionised water) was placed under the flake. Saturating the area first reduced the surface tension and allowed the gelatin to penetrate under the flake.

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The gelatin was dissolved in warm deionised water. It was kept at 60°C in a water bath. Photograph by A. Duckor

After the gelatin cooled a bit (a few minutes), heat was applied to the area with a heated spatula. A piece of silicone-release paper was used between the  spatula and the angel, to prevent damage to the surface from the tackiness of the gelatin. Pressure was gently applied to the flake with the heated spatula, in a ‘rubbing’ motion. The gradual heating softened the gilding and allowed it to be re-shaped onto the surface of the angel. The heat ‘activated’ the gelatin and adhered the flake onto the substrate.

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The heat spatula and brush used in the flake relaying. Photograph by A. Duckor

This method was very successful in relaying the flakes with little breakage. Following re-laying, further cleaning could be done without risking additional damage to the surface.

The left hand of Angel A before and after the flake relaying. Courtesy of Norfolk Museums Service, T1878333.

The bulk of this treatment took place during the summer months of 2014 and allowed for the involvement of both MSc and MA conservation students – a great opportunity to work together and learn from one another!

Erin Murphy using the heat spatula to gently press down a flake and seal it with the gelatin.

Erin Murphy using the heat spatula to gently press down a flake and seal it with the gelatin. Courtesy of Norfolk Museums Service, T1878333.

Rachel Altpeter and Romina Quijano Quinones working together.

Rachel Altpeter and Romina Quijano Quinones working together. Courtesy of Norfolk Museums Service, T1878333.

Yuqi Chock applying gelatin to flaking areas of gilding.

Yuqi Chock applying gelatin to flaking areas of gilding. Courtesy of Norfolk Museums Service, T1878333.

Photographs by A.Duckor and Claire D’Izarny-Gargas.

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One thought on “Let the Treatment Begin!

  1. Pingback: A Heavenly Transformation – The Treatment Continues… | Conservation Lab Chat

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